Mountain Plover

Nicole DollBlog, Education

Mountain Plover

Contrary to what their name suggests, mountain plovers are endemic to the Great Plains of North America and do not inhabit mountain environments or frequent shores like other species of plovers. They are rare in Canada, and listed as endangered under SARA.

Black-tailed Prairie Dog

Nicole DollBlog, Education

Black-tailed prairie dog

While they may be regarded as a pest to farmers and grazing managers, Black-tailed Prairie Dogs are a keystone species of the prairies, providing habitat and food for many other grassland animals. They are listed as threatened under COSEWIC and Saskatchewan is the only place they are found within Canada.

Sprague’s Pipit

Nicole DollBlog, Education

Sprague's Pipit

Sprague’s Pipit is a medium-sized, ground-nesting bird that is rarely seen. It is usually only detected by its unique song, which is often described as a series of descending tinkling, ethereal notes. It is endemic to the prairies and listed as threatened under SARA.

Loggerhead Shrike (Prairie subspecies)

Nicole DollBlog, Education

Loggerhead Shrike on a barbed-wire fence

Loggerhead shrikes aren’t your typical songbird. They are fierce predators, and since they don’t have sharp talons to hold prey, they use sharp objects instead, like barbed wire fence and thorns on trees. They are listed as threatened under COSEWIC.

Wetlands

Nicole DollBlog, Education

A view of wetlands within the Boreal Forest.

Wetlands perform a multitude of ecosystem functions that are important to both the environment and humans. Flood control, a place for biodiversity, and a canvas for beautiful sunsets are just some of the features that wetlands have to offer, and their positive impact on our ever-changing world speaks for itself. Where would Saskatchewan be without wetlands?

Moving Urban Conservation Forward

Nicole DollBlog, Education

The concept of urban conservation is not new but this last year – under the clouds of a global pandemic – has certainly brought this topic to the fore and more specifically how our natural urban landscapes are critical for our health and wellbeing.

Saskatchewan’s Flat Landscape: Our Biodiverse Grasslands

Nicole DollBlog, Education

Photo of bison grazing in the Qu’Appelle Valley, Saskatchewan

While Saskatchewan’s prairies were once a thriving wilderness roamed by millions of wild bison, much of it has been transformed, with less than 18% of the original native grassland remaining. With such a small amount of Saskatchewan’s irreplaceable native grasslands left, it is crucial to protect these important ecosystems.