parks

Parks

Canada has one of the oldest and most extensive parks systems in the world. CPAWS campaigns to create new parks while acting as a watchdog to ensure existing parks are well-managed.

Current issues

Parks
Canada has one of the oldest and most extensive parks systems in the world. CPAWS campaigns to create new parks while acting as a watchdog to ensure existing parks are well-managed.
Learn more about Parks
National Parks Management Planning Consultations
CPAWS works to ensure that the provinces provincial parks are managed to protect the ecological integrity of the ecosystems they encompass.
Learn more about National Parks Management Planning Consultations
Expand our Provincial Parks system
CPAWS will continue to help Saskatchewan realize its goal for an expanded Provincial Park system.
Learn more about Expand our Provincial Parks system

Saskatchewan is home to two of Canada’s National Parks. Prince Albert National Park protects a large tract of the boreal plains/prairie transition eco-regions. Grasslands National Park protects some of Saskatchewan’s last remaining grasslands and native prairie. Additionally, Saskatchewan is home to 34 provincial parks.

The threat

Prince Albert National Park

Both Woodland Caribou in the north of the Park and Plains Bison in the south are experiencing the results of isolation and fragmentation. Although the Park is large, it is not large enough to provide the necessary habitat for these species to thrive. Continued management planning must ensure the ecological integrity of the parks ecosystems.

Grasslands

Grasslands National Park is still split into an eastern block and a western block. As Parks Canada works to finalize its establishment and connect to the two blocks, the park remains fenced and managed in isolation from the surrounding ecosystem and communities.

What CPAWS is doing

CPAWS Saskatchewan works actively with Parks Canada, as well as other stakeholders, to ensure that proper management practices are followed in our national and provincial parks systems. As a voice for the wilderness, CPAWS speaks on behalf of those who have no voice at the negotiation tables, like the sage grouse, the plains bison, or the woodland caribou. These species find refuge in our national parks and will continue to do so forever so long as their habitat is rightfully protected.

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